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Resettling Communities Successfully

Resettlement

To develop or expand our mines, we sometimes have to move local people and communities from their homes, farms and land.

As we apply the mitigation hierarchy, resettling households is the last step we take after assessing project alternatives as we appreciate how stressful a process it can be for our local communities. If not well planned and carefully managed, resettlement can seriously damage relationships with the local community, harm our social license to operate and even result in regulatory action from the government.

Our approach to land acquisition and resettlement processes is guided by our Social Performance Policy and conducted in compliance with applicable laws and regulations and international best practice, such as that set out by the IFC’s performance standard 5, and includes strict eligibility criteria and cut-off dates. Our overarching objective, wherever resettlement is unavoidable, is to make sure resettled people are better off at the end of the process, an outcome that has life-changing positive impacts for vast majority of the resettled households, notwithstanding the challenging process and change in community. Further details on our approach are available on our website.

We have on-going resettlement projects at North Mara in Tanzania, Pueblo Viejo in the Dominican Republic and at the Lumwana mine in Zambia.
We have on-going resettlement projects at North Mara in Tanzania, Pueblo Viejo in the Dominican Republic and at the Lumwana mine in Zambia.

During 2023, we concluded the Kalimva resettlement process at Kibali in the DRC, which includes the completion and handover of the Avokala host site to the authorities. We have on-going resettlement projects at North Mara in Tanzania, Pueblo Viejo in the Dominican Republic and at the Lumwana mine in Zambia. During 2024, we anticipate starting a resettlement project at the Loulo-Gounkoto Complex in Mali.

Management approach: Resettlement

Governance and accountability

Our President and CEO is ultimately responsible for Social aspects with our Group Sustainability Executive taking the lead in driving the implementation of our Sustainable Development and Social Performance Policies, the associated procedures and overall performance.

The Group Sustainability Executive is supported by regional-level environmental leads as well as dedicated site-level environmental teams who drive implementation at the operational level, including community development and engagement aspects.  The Sustainability Executive is supported by our Group Sustainability Manager, and functional regional leads.
 

Policies and procedures

At a policy level our approach to resettlement is covered by our Social Performance Policy, which commits us to avoid, minimize or mitigate the need for resettlement. This policy complies  with applicable laws and regulations and is guided by international best practice and the IFC’s Performance Standard 5 – as illustrated in the infographic below.

Our resettlement approach compels us to:

  • Work to make sure that the affected parties are fully engaged in, and help to shape, the resettlement process; and
  • Improve or at least restore the relocated persons’ standard of living.

The key features for any resettlement process we undertake are:

  • Establishing a resettlement policy framework;
  • Developing a Public Participation Process (PPP). The PPP encourages the inclusion of any and all opinions and grievances in the compensation process; and
  • Using the results of the PPP for the development and implementation of a Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) which covers aspects such as economic displacement and livelihood restoration. The RAP must be agreed by the affected parties prior to any resettlement occurring.
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